the concept of multi-paradigm programming language – (Manjunath M)

Programming languages are often classified according to their paradigms, e.g. imperative, functional, logic, constraint-based, object-oriented, or aspect-oriented. A paradigm characterizes the style, concepts, and methods of the language for describing situations and processes and for solving problems, and each paradigm serves best for programming in particular application areas. Real-world problems, however, are often best implemented by a combination of concepts from different paradigms, because they comprise aspects from several realms, and this combination is more comfortably realized using multiparadigm programming languages.

In object-oriented programming, programmers can think of a program as a collection of interacting objects, while in functional programming a program can be thought of as a sequence of stateless function evaluations. When programming computers or systems with many processors, process oriented programming allows programmers to think about applications as sets of concurrent processes acting upon logically shared data structures

Some languages are designed to support one particular paradigm (Smalltalk supports object-oriented programming,Haskell supports functional programming), while other programming languages support multiple paradigms

Many programming paradigms are as well known for what techniques they forbid as for what they enable. For instance, pure functional programming disallows the use of Side effects while Structured programming disallows the use of the goto statement. Partly for this reason, new paradigms are often regarded as doctrinaire or overly rigid by those accustomed to earlier styles.

Multi-paradigm programming language

List of multi-paradigm programming languages

A multi-paradigm programming language is a programming languages that supports more than one programming paradigm[As edadesignertimothy Bodd puts it: “The idea of a multiparadigm language is to provide a framework in which programmers can work in a variety of styles, freely intermixing constructs from different paradigms.” The design goal of such languages is to allow programmers to use the best tool for a job, admitting that no one paradigm solves all problems in the easiest or most efficient way.

All these languages follow the procedural paradigm. That is, they describe, step by step, exactly the procedure that should, according to the particular programmer at least, be followed to solve a specific problem. The efficacy and efficiency of any such solution are both therefore entirely subjective and highly dependent on that programmer’s experience, inventiveness and ability.

Later, Object Oriented l;anguages (like C++, Eiffel and java) were created. In these languages, data, and methods of manipulating the data, are kept as a single unit called an object. The only way that a user can access the data is via the object’s ‘methods’ (subroutines). Because of this, the internal workings of an object may be changed without affecting any code that uses the object. The necessity of every object to have associative methods leads some skeptics to associate OOP with software bloat. polymorphism was developed as one attempt to resolve this dilemma.

Since object-oriented programming is considered a paradigm, not a language, it is possible to create even an object-oriented assembler language. High Level Assembly (HLA) is an example of this that fully supports advanced data types and object-oriented assembly language programming – despite its early origins.

Within imperative programming, which is based on procedural languages, an alternative to the computer-centered hierarchy of structured programming is literate pgming, which structures programs instead as a human-centered web, as in a hypertext essay – documentation is integral to the program, and the program is structured following the logic of prose exposition, rather than compiler convenience.

Independent of the imperative branch,Declearative programming paradigms were developed. In these languages the computer is told what the problem is, not how to solve the problem – the program is structured as a collection of properties to find in the expected result, not as a procedure to follow. Given a database or a set of rules, the computer tries to find a solution matching all the desired properties. The archetypical example of a declarative language is the Fourth generation language SQL, as well as the family of functional languages and Logic programming

Functional programming is a subset of declarative programming. Programs written using this paradigm use functions, blocks of code intended to behave like mathematical functions. Functional languages discourage changes in the value of variables through  assignment, making a great deal of use of recursion instead.

The Logic Programming paradigm views computation as automated reasoning over a corpus of knowledge. Facts about the problem domainare expressed as logic formulae, and programs are executed by applying inference rules over them until an answer to the problem is found, or the collection of formulae is proved inconsistent.

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